We are pleased to announce that four exceptional University of Washington graduate students have been awarded 2016 WRF Innovation Graduate Fellowships in Neuroengineering: David Caldwell (Bioengineering), Phil Mardoum (Neuroscience), Thomas Mohren (Mechanical Engineering), and Claire Rusch (Biology). Read about the new fellows and their research below:

David Caldwell, recipient of a 2016 WRF Innovation Graduate Fellowships in Neuroengineering David Caldwell is an M.D./Ph.D student in Bioengineering working with Rajesh Rao in Computer Science & Engineering and Jeffrey Ojemann in Neurological Surgery. His research focuses broadly on neural connectivity and processing. Specifically, his work aims to enhance neural connectivity through electrical cortical stimulation and characterizing the cortical response to stimulation in human patients implanted with electrocorticographic grids in preparation for epilepsy surgery. David received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in biomedical engineering from the University of Michigan. He is a joint fellow of UWIN and the Big Data for Genomics & Neuroscience (BDGN) Training Grant, and is an Achievement Rewards for College Scientists (ARCS) scholar.
Phil Mardoum, recipient of a 2016 WRF Innovation Graduate Fellowships in Neuroengineering Philip Mardoum is a Ph.D. student in the Neuroscience program working in the labs of Fred Rieke in Physiology and Biophysics and Rachel Wong in Biological Structure. His research focuses on sensory coding in micro-circuits of the retina, and how multiple distinct information streams can be processed in parallel within the same circuitry. He received a bachelor’s degree in Biological Sciences from the University of Chicago.
Thomas Mohren, recipient of a 2016 WRF Innovation Graduate Fellowships in Neuroengineering Thomas Mohren is a Ph.D. student in Mechanical Engineering working with Steve Brunton in Mechanical Engineering and Tom Daniel in Biology. He is interested in how animals use mechanosensory arrays to make fast and robust control decisions. He uses computational models, sparse sensing techniques and neurophysiological approaches to study hawk moth flight control, with the aim of uncovering generalizable principles in biology that can inspire novel engineering solutions. Thomas received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Aerospace Engineering from Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. He is co-funded by UWIN and the Air Force Center of Excellence on Nature-Inspired Flight Technologies and Ideas (NIFTI, and was a recipient of a 2014-2015 Fulbright scholarship.
Claire Rusch, recipient of a 2016 WRF Innovation Graduate Fellowships in Neuroengineering Claire Rusch is a Ph.D. student in Biology working in Jeff Riffell’s lab. Her research interests focus on the how the environment shapes and is processed by the nervous system to control motor responses and behavior. Specifically, her project aims to better understand the neural circuits and processing of visual information and memory in honeybees– an attractive system for learning because of its robust behaviors and relatively simplified neuroanatomy that permits neurophysiological recording from identifiable neurons. Claire received a master’s degree in Neuroscience, Behavior and Cognition from Paul Sabatier University, France. She is co-funded by UWIN and the Air Force Center of Excellence on Nature-Inspired Flight Technologies and Ideas (NIFTI).