UWIN seminar May 2017 - speakers Andre Berndt and Sam BurdenUWIN’s May seminar features a fantastic pair of short talks by UWIN faculty Andre Berndt and Sam Burden:

  • “Engineering tools for optical monitoring and control of neuronal activity”
    Andre Berndt, Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington
  • “Predictive dynamical models for human sensorimotor control of teleoperated robots”
    Sam Burden, Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington.

The seminar is on Wednesday, May 17th, at 3:30pm in Husky Union Building (HUB) 337.  Refreshments will be served prior to the talks.

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Abstracts:

“Engineering tools for optical monitoring and control of neuronal activity” (Andre Berndt):

Light activated channels and pumps are well-established, powerful tools for revealing the function of neuronal circuits in the field of optogenetics. Proteins such as channelrhodopsin and halorhodopsin had a groundbreaking impact on neuroscience research because they allow for precise control of specific neuronal populations even in freely moving animals. However, the application range of these tools is critically connected to their inherent biophysical properties. In my talk, I will describe how molecular engineering created proteins with novel features which allowed us to broaden the application range of optogenetics.

 
“Predictive dynamical models for human sensorimotor control of teleoperated robots” (Sam Burden):

Human interaction with the physical world is increasingly mediated by automation — planes assist pilots, robots assist surgeons, and cars assist drivers. To guarantee performance in such systems, we seek predictive models for the dynamic closed-loop interaction that takes place between humans and their semi-autonomous partners. Focusing on trajectory tracking in robot teleoperation, we hypothesize that operators learn to invert robot dynamics. This talk will present the resulting dynamic inverse model and preliminary results from experiments designed to test the model inversion hypothesis.