Howard Chizeck and Bill Moody will give short talks at the October 2018 UWIN seminarThe UWIN seminar series resumes for the 2018-19 academic year!  The October 2018 UWIN seminar features an exciting pair of short talks by UWIN faculty members Howard Chizeck and Bill Moody:

  • “Challenges in Optimizing Deep Brain Stimulation”
    Howard Chizeck, Professor, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Washington
  • “Trans-skull imaging of brain activity in neonatal mice during spontaneous sleep-wake cycles”
    Bill Moody, Professor, Department of Biology, University of Washington

The seminar is on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 3:30pm in Health Sciences Building (HSB) G-328.  Refreshments will be served prior to the talks.

Abstracts:

“Challenges in Optimizing Deep Brain Stimulation” (Howard Chizeck):

Deep Brain Stimulation is an approved treatment for Parkinson’s Disease and essential tremor, and is under investigation at various institutions for several other neurological conditions. New devices make it possible to optimally select stimulation parameters for currently approved “open loop” treatments, and to implement closed loop algorithms that adjust stimulation “on the fly,” so as to address tradeoffs between symptom management and side effects. Recent results that we have obtained will be briefly described, and current challenges will be described.

 

“Trans-skull imaging of brain activity in neonatal mice during spontaneous sleep-wake cycles” (Bill Moody):

Widely propagating waves of electrical activity occur throughout the brain during early development, where they provide long- and short-range synchrony in neuronal activity that helps to establish cortical circuitry. Neuronal activity that is synchronized over large distances also occurs during adult slow-wave sleep and serves a central role in memory consolidation. Using trans-skull optical imaging of brain activity in neonatal mice, combined with power spectral analysis of EMG activity to measure sleep-wake cycles and dimensionality reduction methods to analyze the spatio-temporal patterns of brain activity, we have discovered that pan-cortical waves of activity, which had previously been thought to occur during all behavioral states in the developing brain, are in fact already segregated into sleep cycles by the end of the first postnatal week. Our results suggest that pan-cortical waves of activity in development may establish the long-range neuronal circuitry that is used in adult sleep to consolidate events experienced during wakefulness into long-term memory.