Join us in welcoming UWIN’s newest undergraduate and post-baccalaureate fellows!  Nine undergraduate students and six post-baccalaureate researchers were awarded 2019 UWIN Fellowships.  You can read all about their exciting research below, and follow the links to see all of UWIN’s undergraduate and post-baccalaureate fellows.

2019 UWIN Undergraduate Fellows

Manjari Anant, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Manjari Anant (2019 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Bioengineering, working with Samira Moorjani in the Physiology and Biophysics department. Manjari’s research focuses on a novel neural stimulation technique called movement-triggered stimulation. She is investigating whether movement-triggered stimulation modulates neuronal connectivity differently based on the original strength of the synaptic connection. If movement-triggered stimulation can strengthen cortical connections, it would have implications in aiding individuals with decreased motor function due to injury, disease or age.
Makoto Eyre , one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Makoto Eyre (2019 Fellow) is a post-baccalaureate undergraduate student in Mechanical Engineering with a background in architecture (Rhode Island School of Design, Bachelor of Architecture 2014). Working with Kat Steele and Michael Rosenberg of the Ability & Innovation Lab in Mechanical Engineering, Makoto’s research focuses on comparing motor coordination strategies (muscle synergies) employed by the human body during steady state and non-steady state modes of walking, and the effects that the mechanical properties of ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) have on them. The goal of this research is to inform AFO customization for neuromuscular rehabilitation, potentially yielding prescriptions that are optimal across a broader set of daily activities. After his time at the UW, Makoto aims to utilize neuromuscular and biomechanical methods of examining human motion to inform human habitation of outer space.
Nathaniel Linden, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Nathaniel Linden (2019 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Bioengineering with a minor in Applied Mathematics. He is working with Bing Brunton in the Biology Department. Nathaniel’s research focuses on applying computational techniques to study cortical development in the brain using mouse models. His current project involves developing an analysis pipeline to model neural activity from wide-field calcium imaging data of the developing mouse cortex.
Jon Luntzel, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Jon Luntzel (2019 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Computer Science who is working with Michael Beyeler in Psychology and Ariel Rokem in the eScience Institute. Jon’s research focuses on computational models for retinal implants. This research will help clarify how visual aids create visual percepts and progress towards restoring useful vision. Jon intends to contribute a submodule for simulating percepts of subretinal prostheses that interface with the bipolar layer in the retina.
Amanuel Mamo , one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Amanuel Mamo (2019 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Mechanical Engineering working with Tom Daniel in the Biology department. Amanuel is collaborating with Melanie Anderson on the “Smellicopter” project, a bio-inspired odor-guided micro-air vehicle. He is using Robot Operating System (ROS) and controls associated with micro-scale quadrotors to enhance the capabilities of this odor tracking air vehicle.
Kathryn Stangret , one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Kathryn Stangret (2019 fellow) is an undergraduate student intending on majoring in Neuroscience and Bioengineering. She is working with Jeff Ojemann and Courtnie Paschall in the department of Neurosurgery. Kathryn’s research involves analyzing the frequency content of resting state electrocorticography (ECoG) data from people is epilepsy. She is working to determine what connections there are between the frequency domain and the microelectrophysiology studies of epileptic tissue in the brain.
Nicholas Thomas, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Nicholas Thomas (2019 fellow) is a Bioengineering undergraduate student working with Amy Orsborn in Electrical & Computer Engineering and Bioengineering. Nicholas’ work focuses on implementing real time markerless motion tracking for the study of hand kinematics. This research will help facilitate the study of learning relating to high dimensional movements and object manipulation. Nicholas intends to pursue a Master’s degree in bioengineering upon graduation. Outside of research, he enjoys exploring his passions of both the culinary arts and ceramics.
Joey Ullmann , one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Joey Ullmann (2019 Fellow) is an undergraduate student in Biology and Psychology working with David Gire in the Laboratory of Comparative Systems Neuroscience. Joey’s research investigates how the integration of octopus sucker mechanical sensory information delegated along the length of an arm modulates the intensity and pattern of localized muscle activity during foraging and exploration. His goal is to derive a model based on localized mechanical sensorimotor feedback loops, which will be informed by the observed patterns of activity within the nerve cord.
Maximilian Walter, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Maximilian Walter (2019 Fellow) is an undergraduate student in the Bioengineering department working with Rajiv Saigal in the Neurological Surgery department. Max’s research focuses on developing biodegradable microneedle arrays for controlled drug delivery for the treatment of spinal cord injury. After receiving his bachelor’s degree, he intends to pursue a Masters in Bioengineering at the University of Washington.

2019 UWIN Post-baccalaureate Fellows

Sufia Ahmad, one of the UWIN post-baccalaureate fellows in neuroengineering Sufia Ahmad (2019 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with Beth Buffalo in the Physiology and Biophysics department. Sufia is conducting simultaneous electrophysiological recordings from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe in awake behaving non-human primates to understand how neurological systems are affected by aging. By using behavioral tasks based on those used in human studies that are sensitive to a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease, she hopes this work may be translated into early diagnostic and treatment therapies for patients with memory deficit disorders. Sufia graduated from Seattle University where she received a Bachelor’s of Science in Psychology..
Evyn Dickinson, one of the UWIN post-baccalaureate fellows in neuroengineering Evyn Dickinson (2019 Fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with John Tuthill in Physiology and Biophysics and Bing Brunton in Biology. Evyn’s research focuses on the neural circuitry involved in Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies) locomotion. He uses optogenetics to manipulate and characterize sensorimotor integration during walking and turning behavior. Evyn graduated from Bowdoin College with Bachelor’s degrees in Biology and French.
Isabelle Hua, one of the UWIN post-baccalaureate fellows in neuroengineering Isabelle Hua (2019 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with Steve Perlmutter in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics. Isabelle’s research focuses on the use of activity-dependent epidural stimulation in humans to induce spike-timing dependent plasticity to improve motor function recovery following a spinal cord injury. Isabelle attended the University of Washington where she received Bachelor’s degrees in Biochemistry and Neuroscience with departmental Honors.
Briana Smith, one of the UWIN post-baccalaureate fellows in neuroengineering Briana Smith (2019 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with Andrea Stocco and Lori Zoellner in the Psychology department. Briana is investigating emotional trauma and the associated maladaptive cognitive and behavioral conditions that often follow. She is developing a computational model of intrusive memory retrieval patterns symptomatic of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The model aims to follow PTSD recovery curves and accurately represent the neural correlates of intrusive memory retrieval by incorporating individual moderating factors, such as trauma severity, environmental stress, and personal history. Briana graduated from Auburn University with a Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering.
Gg Tran, one of the UWIN post-baccalaureate fellows in neuroengineering Gg Tran(2019 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with Ione Fine and Geoffrey Boynton in the Department of Psychology. Gg’s research uses fMRI data to model the population receptive field (pRF) in people with visual impairments. The goal is to improve estimation of the neural pRF, and subsequently to better predict differences in neural activity in people with normal vision versus in those with vision impairments. She received a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and a minor in Applied Mathematics at the University of Washington.
Willem Weertman, one of the UWIN post-baccalaureate fellows in neuroengineering Willem Weertman (2019 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with David Gire in the Laboratory of Comparative Systems Neuroscience in the Psychology department. Willem’s research is focused on understanding how chemical information is integrated within the octopus sucker. The goal of this work is to build a model of chemosensory motor feedback loops within the arm of the octopus. Weertman graduated from the University of Washington with a Bachelor’s of science in Oceanography with a minor in Marine Biology and will begin as a graduate student at Alaska Pacific University in the fall of 2019.