See information on applying for UWIN’s post-baccalaureate fellowships.

Current UWIN Post-baccalaureate Fellows

Comron Ganji (2017 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with Steve Perlmutter in the Physiology and Biophysics department. Comron’s research uses the Neurochip, a brain-computer interface, to induce spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) following a spinal cord contusion injury in a rat model. He will be using the Neurochip to explore which type of recording/stimulating patterns can best induce STDP as a means to aid in recovery of motor function following a spinal cord injury. Comron attended the University of Washington where he received a bachelor’s degree in Neurobiology with departmental honors.
Natalie Koh (2017 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with Andrea Stocco in Psychology and Thomas Grabowski in Radiology. Natalie’s research uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to determine if it is possible to bias the retrieval of specific types of memories. The goal of her work is to inform current human brain-to-brain interfacing paradigms. Natalie is also broadly interested in the development of brain-computer interfaces and neural prosthetics for clinical use. She graduated from the University of Washington with a bachelor’s degree in Biology and Psychology (with Honors) in 2016, and was a recipient of the Mary Gates Research Scholarship award and the Guthrie Prize for best empirical paper.
Emily Kubota (2017 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with Jason Yeatman at the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences. Emily’s research focuses on understanding the function of the ventral temporal cortex (VTC) in perception. She is currently examining how task demands affect activation in the VTC using fMRI studies, and eventually hopes to expand her work to see whether these patterns of activation can be used to predict behavioral data, such as reading scores in individuals with Dyslexia. Emily recently graduated from Pomona College with a bachelor’s degree in Cognitive Science.

Emeritus UWIN Post-baccalaureate Fellows

GraddisNile Nile Graddis (2015 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with Joel Zylberberg and Eric Shea-Brown in the Applied Mathematics department. Nile’s research uses computational modeling and machine learning tools to better understand how populations of neurons in the dentate gyrus encode detailed information about the timing of past stimuli. He earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of Washington, where he majored in Psychology and minored in Applied Mathematics.
Kinn Sam Kinn (2016 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with Bing Brunton in the Biology department. Sam’s research focuses on the optimal placement of sparse neural sensors for reliable information processing in neural systems. He is broadly interested in the applications of machine learning and optimization for more effective diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders and for improvement of signal processing and control in brain-computer interfaces. He received a Bachelor of Science with Honors in Electrical Engineering with a minor in Applied Mathematics at the University of Washington.
MarrettKarl Karl Marrett (2015 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with Bing Brunton in the Biology department. Karl’s research focuses on techniques to leverage sparsity in the analysis of neural data. His broader interests are information processing systems and their applications to neuroprosthetics. He recently graduated from the University of Washington where he majored in Neurobiology and Computational Neuroscience. His awards include a Mary Gates Research Scholarship and a Levinson Emerging Scholars Award.
MellemaCooper Cooper Mellema (2015 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with Chet Moritz in the Rehabilitation Medicine department and Adrienne Fairhall in the Physiology and Biophysics department. Cooper’s research focuses on analyzing brain-computer interface (BCI) tasks, specifically to improve the processing of electrophysiological data for use in a BCI. He received bachelor’s degrees in Physics: Biophysics, Neurobiology, and in Biochemistry from the University of Washington, where he was also awarded a Mary Gates Research Scholarship.
MendozaJoshua Joshua Mendoza (2015 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with Eric Shea-Brown in the Applied Mathematics department. Joshua’s research investigates how neural network topology influences the regulation of a two-phase breathing rhythm, with the pre-Bötzinger and Bötzinger complexes being the areas of focus. He also looks at how sensitive the network activity is to external perturbations. He is interested in pursuing a graduate degree in computer vision in the future.
Renno Taylor Renno (2016 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with Chantel Prat in the Psychology department. For the last two years, Taylor’s research has examined the effects of belief-influenced cognitive placebos on memory. Obtaining her Bachelors of Science in Psychology in 2016, her post-baccalaureate research explores how neuro-stimulation and neurofeedback training differently affect cognitive processes. Taylor will be attending the Western Washington University’s Experimental Psychology Masters degree program in the fall of 2016.
Sivitilli Dominic Sivitilli (2016 fellow) is a post-baccalaureate researcher working with David Gire and Joseph Sisneros in the Psychology department. Dominic’s research focuses on neural mechanisms underlying movement in response to chemical signals (chemotaxis) in the octopus. The goal of his work is to understand decision-making and behavior in an algorithmically transparent model for intelligence and to develop related computational and robotic systems. Dominic graduated from the University of Washington with a bachelor’s degree in Biology and Psychology and will begin as a graduate student in Behavioral Neuroscience in the fall of 2016.
Strodtman Douglas Strodtman (2016 fellow) is post-baccalaureate researcher in Jason Yeatman’s Brain Development & Education lab at the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences. Douglas’s research aims to identify biomarkers for dyslexia and arrive at a computational model that allows for predictive classification of reading ability. This work uses large, publicly available datasets and proprietary tractography software to investigate correlations between diffusion properties of white matter pathways and behavioral data. He recently completed a Bachelor’s Degree in Speech & Hearing Sciences at Portland State University.