See information on applying for UWIN’s undergraduate fellowships.

Current UWIN Undergraduate Fellows

Mahad Ahmed, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Mahad Ahmed (2018 fellow) is an undergraduate student working with Tanvi Deora and Tom Daniel in the Biology department. He is investigating the neural basis of learning in hawkmoths (Manduca Sexta). Mahad’s current project looks at mechanosensation’s role in this learning, seeing how different flower shapes influence the moth’s feeding behaviors.
Mackenzie Andrews, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Mackenzie Andrews (2018 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Bioengineering and Neurobiology with a minor in Neural Computation and Engineering. She is working with Charles Chavkin in the Departments of Pharmacology. Mackenzie’s research investigates how brain regions communicate to drive behaviors associated with drug abuse and addiction. She is designing a device to be simultaneously implanted in two brain regions in mice capable of optogenetic modulation and electrophysiological recording of neural activity. After graduating, Mackenzie will be continuing this project into her Bioengineering Master’s thesis where she will be doing the computational work required to analyze the data.
Alyssa Giedd, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Alyssa Giedd (2018 fellow) is an undergraduate student working with Momona Yamagami and Sam Burden in the Electrical Engineering department. Alyssa’s research focuses on the development and testing of a remote data collection tool for quantifying motor planning. This will allow for the collection of data remotely so a greater number of individuals can participate in research on Cerebral Palsy.
Joyce Huang, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Joyce Huang (2018 fellow) is an undergraduate student in the Bioengineering department, working with Rajiv Saigal in the Neurosurgery Department. Joyce’s research focuses on electronically controlled drug release for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. She intends to pursue an MD degree and continue research in neuroengineering after graduation.
Aiden Maloney-Bertelli, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Aiden Maloney-Bertelli (2018 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering who works with Ramkumar Sabesan in the Ophthalmology department. Aiden is working on image processing algorithms for optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the human retina to support research in the emerging field of optophysiology. She and her lab aim to use a variant of OCT to noninvasively measure neuronal responses to visual stimuli and, thereby, provide insight into how the retina functions in healthy and diseased states.
Clara Orndoff, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Clara Orndorff (2018 fellow) is an undergraduate Mechanical Engineering major working with Tom Libby and Sam Burden in the Electrical Engineering department. Clara’s research includes designing and building a system that will be able to analyze the different methods with which moths use multi-sensory information to increase their agility. Specifically, this system will quantify a flying moth’s response to mechanically applied perturbations. The goal of this work is to obtain results that can be used to build and improve nature-inspired flying robots.

Emeritus UWIN Undergraduate Fellows

Elliott Abe, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Elliott Abe (2016 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Physics working with Adrienne Fairhall in the Physiology and Biophysics department. Elliott’s research investigates trial and error learning in the Zebra Finch song system. He is analyzing the timing variation of male Zebra Finch songs, with the goal of using data from recordings to inform bio-physiological models of trial and error learning. After graduation, Elliott plans to pursue a Ph.D. in physics, with an emphasis in computational neuroscience modeling.
Karley Benoff, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Karley Benoff (2017 fellow) is an undergraduate Mechanical Engineering major working with Kat Steele in the ME Ability & Innovation Lab. Karley’s research focuses on designing and optimizing body-powered orthoses for individuals with neuromuscular deficits of the arm. She will test her device with participants using electromyography (EMG) signals to evaluate motor learning and user adaptation. Karley’s goal is have the final orthosis design be open source.
Camille Birch, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Camille Birch (2016 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Bioengineering working with Eberhard Fetz in the Physiology and Biophysics department. Camille’s research uses the Neurochip-3, a powerful new head-mounted electrophysiology system, to investigate the behavioral state-dependence of functional neural connectivity between the prefrontal cortex and the motor cortex of non-human primates. She is particularly interested in neural engineering research contributing to advances in rehabilitation medicine.
Julie Fedorko, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Julie Fedorko (2015 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Neuroscience at Pomona College who worked with David Perkel in the UW Biology and Otolaryngology departments. Julie’s research investigates vocal communication, specifically looking at the vocalizations elicited by male mice when interacting with a potential mate. Quantitatively, the features of the vocalizations that females prefer will be assessed through systematic alterations of the tempo and acoustics.
Monica Harris, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Monica Harris (2017 fellow) is an undergraduate student working with Eatai Roth and Tom Daniel in the Biology department. Monica is interested in sensory processing systems, and her research focuses on the optomotor pitching response of the Hawk Moth (Manduca Sexta). Specifically, she explores how small- and wide-field visual stimuli affect the abdominal flexion of moths in a closed-loop system.
Joe Hodge, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Joe Hodge (2016 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Biomedical Engineering and Organismal Biology at Vanderbilt University working with David Perkel in the UW Biology and Otolaryngology departments. Joe’s research investigates bipedal balancing in birds, as an example of natural multimodal sensory processing. He focuses on the sensory cues and feedback algorithms birds use to maintain balance and upright posture in the face of dynamic perturbations. After receiving his bachelor’s degree, Joe intends to continue research in neuroengineering as part of a Ph.D. program.
Kim Hua, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Kim Hua (2017 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Bioengineering working with Rajesh Rao in the Computer Science & Engineering department. Kim’s research uses electrocorticography (ECoG) to provide direct cortical stimulation as a means of providing tactile feedback in human subjects. She is interested in how different stimulation parameters change human perception. This information can inform future experiments on sensory stimulation and bi-directional brain computer interfaces. Kim aims to pursue a Ph.D. in Bioengineering after graduation.
Linxing Preston Jiang, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Linxing Preston Jiang (2017 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Computer Science who works with Rajesh Rao in the Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering and Andrea Stocco in the Psychology department. Preston is researching the relationship between transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and the elicited visual perception of human participants. After graduation, Preston hopes to pursue a Ph.D. to keep working in the field of brain computer interface and machine learning, and possibly bridging the gap between BCI and operating systems.
Jessica Johnson, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Jessica Johnson (2017 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Bioengineering working with Rajiv Saigal in the Neurosurgery Department. Jessica’s research investigates the use of a controlled, localized drug release system for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. After receiving her bachelor’s degree, she intends to pursue a Ph.D. in Bioengineering, with a focus in neuroscience.
Darby Losey, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Darby Losey (2015 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Computer Science and Neurobiology who worked with Raj Rao in the Computer Science department and Andrea Stocco in the Psychology department. Darby’s interests lie in using noninvasive brain-computer interfacing to increase human communication abilities. He is specifically examining the potential for using phosphenes as an information-encoding paradigm. After graduation, he hopes to pursue a Ph.D. that will allow him continue bridging the gap between computers and the brain in order to help solve medical problems.
Christine McCreary, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Christine McCreary (2015 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Computer Science who worked with Bing Brunton in the Biology Department. Christine’s research involves computational analysis of pelvic nerve signal recordings. This work is part of a larger collaborative endeavor to develop a wireless implantable electronic device that can decode pelvic signals and appropriately control the bladder of a patient. After receiving her bachelor’s degree, Christine intends on continuing research in computational neuroscience while enrolled in a Ph.D. program.
Albert Ng, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Albert Ng (2015 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Neurobiology and Medical Anthropology & Global Health who worked with Beth Buffalo and Adrienne Fairhall in the Physiology and Biophysics department. Albert’s research focuses on how virtual spatial representations in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex relate to navigation, memory, and learning, with the goal of augmenting the development of technologies involving virtual reality tasks.
Ben Pedigo, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Ben Pedigo (2017 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Bioengineering with a minor in Applied Math. He is working with Chet Moritz in the Departments of Rehabilitation Medicine and Physiology & Biophysics. Ben’s research investigates how optogenetic stimulation of the spinal cord may be able to improve upper-limb motor function after a spinal cord injury. He is optimizing the lab’s implantable optogenetic stimulation methods for use in long-term studies in rodents. After graduating, Ben plans to pursue a Ph.D. in bioengineering or a related field, continuing to study the interface between technology and the nervous system.
Marissa Pighin, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Marissa Pighin (2015 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Neurobiology who worked with Chantel Prat and Andrea Stocco in the Psychology department. Marissa’s research aims to develop a neurofeedback paradigm using low-cost wireless EEG headsets. With the development of the neurofeedback training, she will train specific brain oscillation frequencies in order to improve attention. She plans to apply this training technique to healthy individuals in order to improve reading comprehension.
Brandon Pratt, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Brandon Pratt (2015 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, and Neurobiology who worked with Tom Daniel in the Biology department. Brandon studies the encoding properties of abdominal proprioception and wing deflection of the Hawk Moth (Manduca Sexta). He is especially interested in sensory transduction and how it relates to the dynamics and control of movement in living organisms.
Mahdi Ramadan, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Mahdi Ramadan (2016 fellow) is an undergraduate Neurobiology major working with Raj Rao in the Computer Science department. Mahdi has a keen interest in neural engineering and machine learning, and his research focuses on assessing and developing the functionality of electrocorticography-based brain-computer interfaces. He hopes to continue his investigations into rehabilitation technology after graduation.
Alex Rockhill, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Alex Rockhill (2016 fellow) is an undergraduate student completing honors programs in Neurobiology, Applied Math in Biological and Life Science, and Computational Neuroscience. He is working with Wyeth Bair and Anitha Pasupathy in Biological Structure. Alex studies shape recognition in an intermediate structure in the ventral visual pathway. He is specifically investigating whether shape orientation and curvature preferences that have been previously characterized in two dimensions are encoded differently for three-dimensional shapes, with the goal to study dynamic shape encoding in the future.
Gautham Velchuru, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Gautham Velchuru (2017 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Computer Science working with Bing Brunton in the Biology department. Gautham’s work involves developing software for face annotation and emotion recognition, with the goal of creating an automated facial pose recognition pipeline. This will be used along with video and electrocorticography (ECoG) data to gain insight into possible associations between naturalistic brain recordings and behavior. He is especially interested in computer vision and machine learning, and hopes to continue working in those fields.
Stefano Vrizzi, one of the UWIN undergraduate fellows in neuroengineering Stefano Vrizzi (2015 fellow) is an undergraduate student in Neuroscience at the University of Leeds (UK) who worked with Adrienne Fairhall in the UW Physiology and Biophysics department.  Stefano’s research focused on modelling how Bidirectional-Brain-Computer-Spinal Cord-Interface (BBCSI) induces neural plasticity. He has previously investigated computational modeling of how the spinal cord controls motor output. He is heartily passionate about promoting public engagement in science, especially through public talks.